Monthly Archives: February 2015

See? We Told You So

Forbes has a short piece on the ethics and practicalities of having babies on Mars: Birthing Babies On Mars Will Be No Small Feat.

They cover the core reasons why having children (at least for the first fifteen or so years of settlement activity) is a taboo in the Ares Project universe: mainly, there’s no telling whether it will be safe to do so, and in small commercial settlements, babies and small children will consume scarce economic resources without near-term economic return. This originated early on in writing In the Shadow of Ares in the need to explain why Amber Jacobsen was still the only child on Mars after almost fourteen years of settlement activity, and the more we thought about the reasoning behind such a taboo the more real-world sense it made (and the more influence it had on her character and the story, especially the coming-of-age subplot).

Of course, in Ghosts of Tharsis and “He Has Walled Me In” we show that this taboo is starting to break down. This happens in large part because several of the settlements are large enough by the time these stories take place to absorb the economic impact.

[via Transterrestrial Musings]

How the Hugo Awards Became a Battleground

Milo Yiannopoulos offers an interesting if brief sampler of the SFWA conflicts over the past few years along with background on the “Sad Puppies” Hugo slate: How the Hugo Awards Became a Battleground.

But while the examples of manufactured grievance may be absurd, few members of the SFF community are laughing. New York Times bestselling author Larry Correia told us that SFF is currently in the grip of a “systematic campaign to slander anybody who doesn’t toe their line,” which is breeding a culture of fear and self-censorship. “Most authors aren’t making that much money, so they are terrified of being slandered and losing business,” he says. The only exceptions are a “handful of people like me who are either big enough not to give a crap, or too obstinate to shut up.”

Considering Yiannopoulous’ recent coverage of #gamergate controversies and personalities, I wonder if he plans to turn this topic into a similar series of articles covering the various incidents and people involved with the SJWification of SFF. I suspect so, seeing as how Larry Correia was soliciting reader help Wednesday in collecting ugly comments made by the SJWs of SFF, apparently on Yiannopoulous’ behalf (the responses to this solicitation make for some eye-opening reading).